Tag Archives: education

The Barriers To Success And Upward Mobility For First Generation Students And How To Fix The Problem


On March 6, 1860, Abraham Lincoln remarked , "When one starts poor, as most do in the race of life, free society is such that he knows he can better his condition; he knows that there is no fixed condition of labor, for his whole life." Later that year, he was elected to the presidency.

President Lincoln’s words in that speech showcased the American value of upward mobility. In sharp contrast to other western nations of the time, the United States was not married to a traditional caste system. Because of this shared ethos, the United States was — and […]

Restoring America’s Economic Mobility

Frank Buckley
Author, The Way Back: Restoring the Promise of America Frank Buckley is a Foundation Professor at Scalia Law School at George Mason University, where he has taught since 1989. Previously he was a visiting Olin Fellow at the University of Chicago Law School, and he has also taught at McGill Law School, the Sorbonne, and Sciences Po in Paris. He received his B.A. from McGill University and his LL.M. from Harvard University. He is a senior editor of The American Spectator and the author of several books, including The Once and Future King: The Rise of […]

Right On: Utah and the American Dream

How To Fix Your Fatigue (Do This Every Day)

Composite image, includes image by SIphotography / iStock / Getty Images Plus, St. George News OPINION — Is Utah the home of the American Dream? For many yes, for others undoubtedly no. But on a number of quantitative measures, Utah comes closer than any other state.

The essence of the American Dream is that someone born poor can, with hard work and a little luck, become affluent or at least reasonably well off.

In a detailed and highly technical paper titled “ Where Is the Land of Opportunity ?” Raj Chetty of Harvard University and the National Bureau of Economic Research […]

Science fictions

Why has the President’s own top economic officials written to him to veto the granting of universal free clean air? In a similar vein, why have economists been against the granting of free tertiary education as they were adamantly so (and still are) in a previous epoch? Are economists such an insensitive lot who care more about saving taxpayer money than helping others to breathe?

Subsidies can make sense under certain situations. Society loses if perfectly healthy individuals with no trace of genetic malformations and disease cannot avail of clean air because they can’t afford it. But after […]

One the costs of racism in American society

Racism has taken a toll on our society in many ways. One of its costs has been the lost economic mobility of generations of minorities.

I nearly lost mine.

Like so many, I watched the horridness that was on display in Charlottesville this past weekend, including the twisted, angry faces of racist marchers and the blows landed by neo-Nazis and white supremacists. Their punches personified their bigoted views.The rallies should remind us all of the long-term psychological impact of racism and why it is so hard to overcome. It was because of racist policies that my grandmother Big Mama was scared […]

New Data on Wealth Mobility and Their Impact on Models of Inequality

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Using data on families’ wealth over time, we calculate changes in relative wealth mobility; that is, how likely families are to move up or down the wealth distribution, relative to one another. We find families have become less likely to change their position in the wealth distribution over time, and those that do move are less likely to go very far. We also look at the savings behaviors that are associated with more mobile families and find that families that make large movements through the wealth distribution appear to be more likely to own some form of a risky […]

New Data on Wealth Mobility and Their Impact on Models of Inequality

featured hero image

Using data on families’ wealth over time, we calculate changes in relative wealth mobility; that is, how likely families are to move up or down the wealth distribution, relative to one another. We find families have become less likely to change their position in the wealth distribution over time, and those that do move are less likely to go very far. We also look at the savings behaviors that are associated with more mobile families and find that families that make large movements through the wealth distribution appear to be more likely to own some form of a risky […]

Children of the 1% are 77 times more likely to attend an Ivy League school than poor Americans

Harvard University graduation

Harvard University’s 362nd Commencement Exercises on May 30, 2013 in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Paul Marotta/Getty

Donald Trump is pushing ahead with his plan for cutting taxes on corporations and wealthy Americans .

But a new paper published by the National Bureau for Economic Research suggests America’s rich don’t particularly need the help.The research explores the relationship between parents’ incomes and their children’s access to education and economic outcomes in life. The findings are rather striking. "Access to colleges varies greatly by parent income,"writes Raj Chetty of Stanford University and four co-authors. "Children whose parents are in the top 1% of the […]

In defence of Britain’s political centre


Writing in the Times today, Hugo Rifkind charges that centrists do not want to smash up the existing order and start again. As someone who runs a centrist think tank, I can only say: guilty as charged, your honour. And if it please the court, I’d like a further crime to be taken into consideration: I like Britain. By that I mean I don’t recognise the bleak caricatures of this country offered by many people who define themselves as Right or Left.

The Right’s description of a country enfeebled by regulation and tax and divided by migration is a nonsense […]

In Latin America, Populism Is Alive and Well

Founder and leader of the Peronist party and president of Argentina Juan Domingo Peron speaks from the balcony of Government House, circa 1950.

Populism is frequently diagnosed as the root cause of Latin America’s greatest political and economic ills. But just as the human body reacts to an infection by entering a feverish state, many consider populism to be the public’s response to a society in disarray. By understanding the underlying conditions that enabled the rise of strongmen like Argentina’s Juan Domingo Peron or Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez, we can more easily spot the early signs of populism flaring in the region once again. Men of the People

In the centuries following its independence, Latin American history has been marked by economic cycles […]