Tag Archives: education

Analysis | How rising inequality hurts everyone, even the rich


Studies show that in the long run, more inequality means less wealth for everyone. Over the past 40 or so years, the American economy has been funneling wealth and income, reverse Robin Hood-style, from the pockets of the bottom 99 percent to the coffers of the top 1 percent. The total transfer, to the richest from everyone else, amounts to 10 percent of national income and 15 percent of national wealth.

It’s part of a massive concentration of wealth and income among the rich that has put the United States at levels of inequality not seen in this country since […]

How rising inequality hurts everyone, even the rich


Over the past 40 or so years, the American economy has been funneling wealth and income, reverse Robin Hood-style, from the pockets of the bottom 99 percent to the coffers of the top 1 percent. The total transfer, to the richest from everyone else, amounts to 10 percent of national income and 15 percent of national wealth.

It’s part of a massive concentration of wealth and income among the rich that has put the United States at levels of inequality not seen in this country since before World War II. It’s a trend that economists such as Thomas Piketty believe […]

International mobility not inclusive – report


Students from a country or a university perceived as less academically prestigious may have fewer opportunities to study abroad, a team of sociologists have found. Applicants from Yale University received the highest share of positive responses. Photo: 12019/Pixabay About Claudia Civinini
Born and bred in Genoa, Italy, Claudia moved to Australia during her masters degree to teach Italian. She studied and worked in Melbourne for five years before moving to London, where she finally managed to combine her love for writing and her passion for education. She worked for three years as a reporter for the EL Gazette […]

If Americans don’t like the word ‘inequality’, would ‘fairness’ be better?

Alissa Quart

Just in time for last week’s convening of the most powerful and elite in Davos, Oxfam released a disturbing report that 82% of wealth the generated last year went to the richest 1% . Meanwhile, one in five children in rich countries still live in poverty, according to Unicef.

Welcome to the sickeningly unequal distribution of wealth.

These are shameful signs of a society dangerously out of whack. Nevertheless, there’s a battle – and denial over – how we should describe this problem. In some quarters, the word “inequality” itself is rebuked as the culprit. Scholars have even studied why inequality […]

The century gap: Low economic mobility for black men, 150 years after the Civil War

Social-Mobility

Editor’s Note:

On Tuesday, September 5th, the Brookings Institution’s Center on Children and Families and the Race, Prosperity, and Inclusion initiative will host J.D. Vance, author of Hillbilly Elegy, and William Julius William, author of The Truly Disadvantaged, to further explore the race and class divide in America. To register for this event, please click here.

The legacy of American racism is dominating the headlines again. One of the arguments used against the removal or relocation of Confederate symbols is that “it is simply part of our history”. This is not the case. The results of the enslavement, disenfranchisement […]

Pathways A Magazine on Poverty Inequality and Social Policy

A Social Fallout to the Great Recession? Also in this Issue: Arne Kalleberg on a new era of Sociological Perspectives on Social Problems; Continuity and Change in Pathways: A Magazine on Poverty, Inequality, on Poverty, Inequality, and Social Policy, Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality a landmark magazine on poverty, inequality, and social policy. Special Issue 2017 · Bold Visions · Spring 2017 · Login. Pathways a magazine on poverty, inequality, and social policy. Research · Programs · Publications · News · Subscribe · Contact. Robin Weiss. Winter 2011. S. policy. Dalton Conley, New York University. Pathways a magazine […]

A new report says Hispanic identity is fading. Is that really good for America?


About US is a new initiative by The Washington Post to cover issues of identity in the U.S. Sign up for the newsletter .

Last semester, a student of mine named Fernando came to speak with me after the last meeting of my class on Latino identity. He thanked me for getting him to think about not only his roots but his connections with other Latinos, and our contributions to history and culture. He was an engineering student of Colombian ancestry and he’d done a presentation about a 1992 song by Mexican alternative rock group Café Tacuba called “Trópico […]

A new study says much of the rise in inequality is an illusion

Results from these papers are also mixed. Sunday hands me her smartphone and invites me to listen to a recording of her work, which is much better than I expected — though I am not sure what . ‘Predistribution’ is a new word for an old idea – that inequality and poverty should. (Note: see the New Yorker’s helpful infographic about wealth inequality and New York’s subway lines. It’s much more complicated than that. But we believe that the time has come for a new approach. Segregation and the wealth gap According to the Lewis Mumford Center at the […]

Thirteen Economic Facts about Social Mobility and the Role of Education


This Hamilton Project policy memo provides thirteen economic facts on the growth of income inequality and its relationship to social mobility in America; on the growing divide in educational opportunities and outcomes for high- and low-income students; and on the pivotal role education can play in increasing the ability of low-income Americans to move up the income ladder. Chapter 1: Inequality Is Rising against a Background of Low Social Mobility

Central to the American ethos is the notion that it is possible to start out poor and become more prosperous: that hard work—not simply the circumstances you were […]

Report Identifies Steps to Build Pathways Out of Poverty—But Are They Enough?


January 23, 2018, CityLab

While the US has long had a high level of economic inequality, in theory this was balanced in part by the notion that, as President Clinton once put it , “If you work hard and play by the rules, you’ll be rewarded with a good life for yourself and a better chance for your children.” There is at least a grain of truth in Clinton’s nostrum. After World War II, living standards did rise— median wages, adjusted for inflation, went up 95 percent in the quarter century after 1947 . Since the 1970s, however, wages, […]