Tag Archives: employment

Is the American Dream Really Dead?


If the new generation can’t do better than their parents, is the American Dream dead? (Photo: Beth Rankin )

Our latest Freakonomics Radio episode is called “Is the American Dream Really Dead?” (You can subscribe to the podcast at iTunes or elsewhere , get the RSS feed , or listen via the media player above.)

Just a few decades ago, more than 90 percent of 30-year-olds earned more than their parents had earned at the same age. Now it’s only about 50 percent. What happened — and what can be done about it? Below is a transcript […]

From ‘Dream Jobs’ to Bussing Tables Again


Jacquelyn Martin / AP America Hernandez, who is now 34, can divide her working life into two periods: before DACA protections kicked in, and after. Before the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program was created in 2012, Hernandez, whose parents brought her to the U.S. from Mexico when she was three months old, was not eligible to work legally in the United States. Until her late 20s, she cobbled together a living working at various restaurants—not what she’d wanted to do when she graduated with a bachelor’s degree from Fresno State in 2003. She’d had two job offers in […]

Pay-it-forward college financing policies examined in new study

IMAGE

IMAGE: Pay-it-forward financing programs could have differing effects on college access and voter support for tax subsidies, depending on how individual voters fare economically, suggests a paper co-written by University of… view more Credit: Photo by L. Brian Stauffer CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Pay-it-forward college financing programs that enable students to pay tuition upon departure rather than entry may make college more accessible to greater numbers of students in the U.S., a new analysis suggests.

And despite some critics’ fears, PIF programs could increase – rather than erode – public funding for higher education, say the researchers, higher education finance expert […]

Highest Earning Oregonians Pull Away


State of Working Oregon Series

Income inequality in Oregon is at an all-time high, by one key measure. The difference between the average income of the richest 1 out of 1,000 Oregonians and the typical Oregonian has never been bigger. [2]

Confronting income inequality is perhaps the greatest challenge facing Oregon today. A growing body of research indicates that income inequality not only limits the ability of working families to get ahead, it also undermines economic growth. [3] Lawmakers must avoid exacerbating income inequality and enact policies that reduce inequality, to ensure all Oregonians have the opportunity to flourish. The […]

We know there’s a housing crisis – but why is it so much worse for black families?


Shineade Sey is about to move. After three years in a flat in south-east London, she is selling up and buying a house with her partner. Sey, who is half Jamaican and half Ghanaian, says she is lucky – when her former employer was bought out she got a payment that meant she was able to buy her first home. “Without that, I would probably still be saving now,” she says. While her white friends had already bought by the time she could afford to, she was among the first of her friends of black descent. “Their parents weren’t […]

Stable middle-class in SA may be smaller than thought, study shows

Falling short: More and more black Africans are joining SA’s middle class, of which they make up half, but they are still underrepresented in terms of the percentage of the overall population who are black. Race remains a strong predicter of chronic and transient poverty. Picture: ISTOCK

Falling short: More and more black Africans are joining SA’s middle class, of which they make up half, but they are still underrepresented in terms of the percentage of the overall population who are black. Race remains a strong predicter of chronic and transient poverty. Picture: ISTOCK Until recently, SA’s emerging black middle class was hailed as the sign of a new, deracialised postapartheid economy. But research shows the stable middle class may be much smaller than previously thought.

Statistics SA has found that 55% of South Africans are poor, unable to meet their most basic needs. This means only […]

Education Isn’t the Key to a Good Income

A man climbs a ladder.

One of the most commonly taught stories American schoolchildren learn is that of Ragged Dick, Horatio Alger’s 19th-century tale of a poor, ambitious teenaged boy in New York City who works hard and eventually secures himself a respectable, middle-class life. This “rags to riches” tale embodies one of America’s most sacred narratives: that no matter who you are, what your parents do, or where you grow up, with enough education and hard work, you too can rise the economic ladder.

A body of research has since emerged to challenge this national story, casting the United States not as a meritocracy […]

Socioeconomic mobility in the United States


Illustration from a 1916 advertisement for a vocational school in the back of a US magazine. Education has been seen as a key to socioeconomic mobility, and the advertisement appealed to Americans’ belief in the possibility of self-betterment as well as threatening the consequences of downward mobility in the great income inequality existing during the Industrial Revolution .

Socioeconomic mobility in the United States refers to the upward or downward movement of Americans from one social class or economic level to another, [1] through job changes, inheritance, marriage, connections, tax changes, innovation, illegal activities, hard work, lobbying, luck, health […]

Education Isn’t the Key to a Good Income

A man climbs a ladder.

One of the most commonly taught stories American schoolchildren learn is that of Ragged Dick, Horatio Alger’s 19th-century tale of a poor, ambitious teenaged boy in New York City who works hard and eventually secures himself a respectable, middle-class life. This “rags to riches” tale embodies one of America’s most sacred narratives: that no matter who you are, what your parents do, or where you grow up, with enough education and hard work, you too can rise the economic ladder.

A body of research has since emerged to challenge this national story, casting the United States not as a meritocracy […]

Restoring America’s Economic Mobility

Frank Buckley
Author, The Way Back: Restoring the Promise of America Frank Buckley is a Foundation Professor at Scalia Law School at George Mason University, where he has taught since 1989. Previously he was a visiting Olin Fellow at the University of Chicago Law School, and he has also taught at McGill Law School, the Sorbonne, and Sciences Po in Paris. He received his B.A. from McGill University and his LL.M. from Harvard University. He is a senior editor of The American Spectator and the author of several books, including The Once and Future King: The Rise of […]