Tag Archives: lower class

Caste

Formatting a thread over into a post. Late last night I noted that most beyond a certain age are unlikely to be single. Once you hit around 40, the chances are probably lowest in terms of availability. Then as you go beyond that it begins to fall off again due to divorce, eventually loss of partner. Between 35-55, chances are slim in terms of availability. So as I approach the next age group myself, I’ve started to worry and am now thinking of the clock.

This post is less about me and more so about some stuff which I’ve had […]

Meetup, It’s the growing wealth inequality, duh

What each country leads in. http://thedoghousediaries.com/5414

What each country leads in. http://thedoghousediaries.com/5414 Though our deaths by lawn mower lead is probably safe, the United States is stagnating, lagging and falling behind in many areas. Any tenuous connection between the status of the US and racial or gender movements have been disproven by trends since the great recession. The most likely explanation for our plight is the 4 decade long giveaway to upper income brackets in the guise of supply-side or trickle-down economic policies pushed by Republicans.

All of the information herein is readily available and most of it has been widely reported. There will be a […]

Escaping Poverty Requires Almost 20 Years With Nearly Nothing Going Wrong

A man cleans up confetti while surrounded by tourists in Times Square in New York.

A lot of factors have contributed to American inequality: slavery, economic policy, technological change, the power of lobbying, globalization, and so on. In their wake, what’s left?

That’s the question at the heart of a new book, The Vanishing Middle Class: Prejudice and Power in a Dual Economy , by Peter Temin, an economist from MIT. Temin argues that, following decades of growing inequality, America is now left with what is more or less a two-class system: One small, predominantly white upper class that wields a disproportionate share of money, power, and political influence and a much larger, minority-heavy (but […]

Judgment and Decision Making, Vol. 12, No. 5, September 2017, pp. 507–515

How should we measure Americans’ perceptions of socio-economic mobility?

Lawton K. Swan∗ John R. Chambers†Martin Heesacker∗ Sondre S. Nero‡

AbstractSeveral scholars have suggested that Americans’ (distorted) beliefs about the rate of upward social mobility in the United States may affect political judgment and decision-making outcomes. In this article, we consider the psychometric properties of two different questionnaire items that researchers have used to measure these subjective perceptions. Namely, we report the results of a new set of experiments (N = 2,167 U.S. MTurkers) in which we compared the question wording employed by Chambers, Swan and Heesacker (2015) with the question […]

Restoring America’s Economic Mobility

Frank Buckley
Author, The Way Back: Restoring the Promise of America Frank Buckley is a Foundation Professor at Scalia Law School at George Mason University, where he has taught since 1989. Previously he was a visiting Olin Fellow at the University of Chicago Law School, and he has also taught at McGill Law School, the Sorbonne, and Sciences Po in Paris. He received his B.A. from McGill University and his LL.M. from Harvard University. He is a senior editor of The American Spectator and the author of several books, including The Once and Future King: The Rise of […]

Economic Nationalism : Sometimes the Angry Mob Has a Point


In the National Review, Darren Beattie wrote a strong, concise defense of economic nationalism . Economic nationalism is the loose definition for proposals that direct the federal government to set trade policies that support American industries and America’s industrial base. These days in the public consciousness, it is closely identified with President Donald Trump & Steve Bannon’s populist rhetoric and supporters, as well as the supporters of Bernie Sanders and other progressive Democrats. This is in stark contrast to the status quo, that’s in favor of “free markets”: slashed or eliminated regulations on multinational corporations and international trade.

The whole […]

The subtle ways colleges discriminate against poor students

A few years ago, hundreds of college administrators received a survey in the mail. It was designed to figure out what they believed it takes to succeed in college.

The survey listed 12 skills that colleges generally expect students to develop, but the administrators were asked to pick the five most important.

You can do the same exercise below:What the researchers didn’t tell the administrators is that half of these expectations represented independent norms, and the other half represented interdependent norms.And these administrators had a clear bias. (See how your biases compare by filling out the quiz above.)They had a bias […]

Escaping Poverty Requires Almost 20 Years With Nearly Nothing Going Wrong

A man cleans up confetti while surrounded by tourists in Times Square in New York.

A lot of factors have contributed to American inequality: slavery, economic policy, technological change, the power of lobbying, globalization, and so on. In their wake, what’s left?

That’s the question at the heart of a new book, The Vanishing Middle Class: Prejudice and Power in a Dual Economy , by Peter Temin, an economist from MIT. Temin argues that, following decades of growing inequality, America is now left with what is more or less a two-class system: One small, predominantly white upper class that wields a disproportionate share of money, power, and political influence and a much larger, minority-heavy (but […]

The Key Barriers Promoting Inequality


As long as people have different interests and abilities, in a free society, there will be some income inequality. But government-imposed barriers can make it more pronounced by placing unnecessary obstacles in front of people trying to get ahead.

Economists across the spectrum are concerned about this problem. And there is some agreement about how to help fix it.

In his book “Coming Apart,” Charles Murray of the American Enterprise Institute shows an increasing divergence between how the middle and upper classes live. In 1960, regardless of a woman’s income level, many fewer children were born out of wedlock, attendance at […]

We’ll Need Something Other Than Big Government to Stop the ‘Hoarding’ of Economic Opportunity


Richard Reeves’s new book offers a trenchant diagnosis of the economic disparities that separate upper-middle class Americans from those in the working class. But his proposed remedies leave much to be desired.

‘First class,” Renée Zellweger sighs in Jerry Maguire . “It used to be a better meal. Now, it’s a better life.”

Richard V. Reeves of the Brookings Institution worries that tickets to first-class living are becoming impossible to acquire for those born into the working class. Reeves’s latest book, Dream Hoarders: How the American Upper Middle Class Is Leaving Everyone Else in the Dust, Why That Is […]