Tag Archives: skills

Restoring America’s Economic Mobility

Frank Buckley
Author, The Way Back: Restoring the Promise of America Frank Buckley is a Foundation Professor at Scalia Law School at George Mason University, where he has taught since 1989. Previously he was a visiting Olin Fellow at the University of Chicago Law School, and he has also taught at McGill Law School, the Sorbonne, and Sciences Po in Paris. He received his B.A. from McGill University and his LL.M. from Harvard University. He is a senior editor of The American Spectator and the author of several books, including The Once and Future King: The Rise of […]

The concept of “fissure” explains a lot of what’s wrong with the economy


There was a time if you looked around your office everyone was an employee of the company’s whose name was on the door. Now, odds are the person you call for tech support, the person at the front desk, and the cleaning staff all work for someone else, namely a firm that supplies contractors to companies like yours. This is known as workplace fissure.

Research by economists Larry Katz and Alan Krueger has explored the trends in alternative work arrangements like these (pdf). They estimate that non-standard employment (gig work, temp work, contractors) accounted for a around 10% of American […]

How Child Care Enriches Mothers, and Especially the Sons They Raise


Jasmin Cross trying to study while her sons, Sebastian and Vyvyan, played in their home in Portland, Ore. She attends a community college and their father works full time, which she said they could not do without free child care through Head Start. As many American parents know, hiring care for young children during the workday is punishingly expensive, costing the typical family about a third of its income.

Helping parents pay for that care would be expensive for society, too. Yet recent studies show that of any policy aimed to help struggling families, aid for high-quality care has the […]

The American Dream is both real and at risk.


This fundamental paradox – that today is a good time and a challenging time to be a young person in America – is at the heart of Our Work.

Many young people are better off than ever before in America. High school graduation is at an all-time high, and teen pregnancy is at a historic low. More young children are in preschool, and fewer teens are using drugs and alcohol. More young people are graduating college, and fewer young people are in prison. But many young people still face enormous challenges. Just over 12 percent of youth are not in […]

Getting ahead in the city is hard. In rural America, it’s even harder.


Photo by Brett Carlsen/Getty Images It has been snowed over by the rallying stock market and the cascade of controversies in the early months of the Trump administration, but the 2016 election revealed a deep economic and geographic divide in America. That divide remains critical — though not sufficient — to understanding both Donald Trump’s victory in that election and the policy debates that have defined his presidency so far.

Trump’s victory over Hillary Clinton was fueled by a growing Republican dominance in rural areas , as NPR’s Danielle Kurtzleben wrote last fall. Those areas have been left behind by […]

Stephen Moore: Government makes the poor poorer


For all the obsessing in Washington regarding income inequality, why isn’t there more outrage about government policies that exacerbate the problem? There are hundreds of programs that increase poverty in America. Last week, at the Heritage Foundation forum on this very topic, my colleagues exposed many of these programs.

Economist Don Boudreaux, of George Mason University, unmasked two such policies. One is trade protectionism. Trade barriers raise prices and act as a regressive tax on Americans, Boudreaux explains. They also stunt the very process of innovation that makes goods and services widely available to people at affordable prices to begin […]

Government Makes the Poor Poorer


STEPHEN MOORE

RELEASE: TUESDAY, APRIL 11, 2017

Government Makes the Poor PoorerDennis Prager is off. The following is a column by Stephen Moore.For all the obsessing in Washington over income inequality, why isn’t there more outrage over government policies that exacerbate the problem? There are hundreds of programs that increase poverty in America. Last week, at the Heritage Foundation forum on this very topic, my colleagues exposed many of these programs.Economist Don Boudreaux of George Mason University unmasked two such policies. One is trade protectionism. Trade barriers raise prices and act as a regressive tax on Americans, Boudreaux explains. They also […]

Urban Inequality Is a Crisis, But Don’t Blame Techies for It


As technology companies and the techies who work for them have headed to cities, they have increasingly been blamed for the deepening problems of housing affordability and urban inequality.

A few years ago, for example, the San Francisco-based writer Rebecca Solnit complained that the Bay Area’s conflict pitted “writers, artists, activists, environmentalists, eccentrics” against the newly moneyed tech elite.

But there is little evidence that the influx of wealthy people into the urban core and the transformation of some leading creative neighborhoods had led to any substantial diminution of these cities’ overall creative capacities. In fact, cities like New York, London, […]

Economic Mobility: Research & Ideas on Strengthening Families, Communities & the Economy

Economic Mobility book

Economic Mobility: Research & Ideas on Strengthening Families, Communities & the Economy is a new publication released by the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis and the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. The authors of the essays in this volume explore a range of issues and concepts central to understanding how—and how well—people are able to move economically.

Foreword

Janet Yellen, Chair, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System The Importance of Economic Mobility (PDF) Introduction Ray Boshara, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, and David Buchholz, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve […]

How Invisible Inequality Hurts the Poor


We need to confront how increasing income inequality is affecting people’s inner lives. In a lecture at INSEAD’s Fontainebleau campus a couple of months ago, Professor Robert Frank of Cornell University argued that pure luck (beyond effort and personal circumstances) would become more salient for professional success and quality of life in the context of a winner-take-all society fuelled by technology ( digitalisation in particular) and new ways of doing business. Frank’s argument resonates: Economic and social advantages clearly are disproportionately accruing to the “lucky” few who create the next big start-up or come up with a digital idea […]