Tag Archives: upper class

Escaping Poverty Requires Almost 20 Years With Nearly Nothing Going Wrong

A man cleans up confetti while surrounded by tourists in Times Square in New York.

Keith Bedford / Reuters A lot of factors have contributed to American inequality: slavery, economic policy, technological change, the power of lobbying, globalization, and so on. In their wake, what’s left?

That’s the question at the heart of a new book, The Vanishing Middle Class: Prejudice and Power in a Dual Economy , by Peter Temin, an economist from MIT. Temin argues that, following decades of growing inequality, America is now left with what is more or less a two-class system: One small, predominantly white upper class that wields a disproportionate share of money, power, and political influence and a […]

Editorial: Focus on class missing in higher education

Editorial: Focus on class missing in higher education

Going to college is heralded as the gateway to a better life, to a well-paying job living in a nice house in a well-off, middle- to upper-class neighborhood. College is and always has been advertised as a ticket to improvement.

But the reality is far different. This week, The Ithacan explored the intersections between class and higher education and found that postsecondary learning and the benefits that accompany a college degree are disproportionately further out of reach for many low-income families. The problem is institutional and the impact is staggering, creating an environment that advantages those who can afford the […]

Restoring America’s Economic Mobility

Frank Buckley
Author, The Way Back: Restoring the Promise of America Frank Buckley is a Foundation Professor at Scalia Law School at George Mason University, where he has taught since 1989. Previously he was a visiting Olin Fellow at the University of Chicago Law School, and he has also taught at McGill Law School, the Sorbonne, and Sciences Po in Paris. He received his B.A. from McGill University and his LL.M. from Harvard University. He is a senior editor of The American Spectator and the author of several books, including The Once and Future King: The Rise of […]

The fading American dream: Trends in absolute income mobility since 1940

Abstract

We estimated rates of “absolute income mobility”—the fraction of children who earn more than their parents—by combining data from U.S. Census and Current Population Survey cross sections with panel data from de-identified tax records. We found that rates of absolute mobility have fallen from approximately 90% for children born in 1940 to 50% for children born in the 1980s. Increasing GDP growth rates alone cannot restore absolute mobility to the rates experienced by children born in the 1940s. However, distributing current GDP growth more equally across income groups as in the 1940 birth cohort would reverse more than […]

Young Americans aren’t moving like they used to

Americans instinctively know that sometimes, in order to move up, you have to move out. And moving from one place to another has long been a key element of upward mobility in the nation. Until now.

Today, few cities in the country combine economic dynamism with affordability. New trends, meanwhile, demonstrate that while some people are still moving, their reasons aren’t what they used to be.

Throughout history, brave citizens have left the familiar behind for a new home offering a blend of economic opportunity, affordability and quality of life. The Census Bureau’s latest metropolitan population estimates , released March 23, […]

Young Americans aren’t moving like they used to: Column

XXX SILICON-PERKS-18.JPG USA CA

Too much urban growth is fueled by retirees, not scrappy citizens seeking a better future.

(Photo: Jessica Brandi Lifland, for USA TODAY) Americans instinctively know that sometimes, in order to move up, you have to move out. And moving from one place to another has long been a key element of upward mobility in the nation. Until now.

Today, few cities in the country combine economic dynamism with affordability. New trends, meanwhile, demonstrate that while some people are still moving, their reasons aren’t what they used to be.Throughout history, brave citizens have left the familiar behind for a new home […]

Charlotte’s big report on economic mobility was a letdown — because the city is anxious for action


More than 20 minutes before a blue-ribbon commission unveiled its vision for eliminating disparities in Charlotte, the sizable parking deck outside the Government Center was closed off.

It was full. Yet people still streamed down the sidewalks of Second Ward to hear the presentation.

In one of the most visible shows of civic cooperation and muscle in recent memory, business and political leaders spent nearly two hours Monday morning discussing a new report full of strategies to alleviate poverty and help people climb the economic ladder.The event drew dignitaries from all corners of Charlotte. But the much-anticipated report left much still […]

Restoring America’s Economic Mobility

Frank Buckley
Author, The Way Back: Restoring the Promise of America Frank Buckley is a Foundation Professor at Scalia Law School at George Mason University, where he has taught since 1989. Previously he was a visiting Olin Fellow at the University of Chicago Law School, and he has also taught at McGill Law School, the Sorbonne, and Sciences Po in Paris. He received his B.A. from McGill University and his LL.M. from Harvard University. He is a senior editor of The American Spectator and the author of several books, including The Once and Future King: The Rise of […]

SLEZAK: Fixing poverty starts with change of thinking

Riley Slezak

America is commonly called the land of opportunity, a place where if you work hard and do the right thing you’ll be financially secure. This image of America as a beacon for hope and prosperity is not entirely inaccurate, but it does have some major flaws. By teaching that hard work is the main ingredient for a large bank account and overall financial prosperity, it’s also implied that those living in poverty must be lazy. A common refrain from those free of the burden of poverty is that people who are on welfare are leeching off of the system […]

Remarks by the President on Economic Mobility

THE PRESIDENT: Thank you. (Applause.) Thank you, everybody. Thank you so much. Please, please have a seat. Thank you so much. Well, thank you, Neera, for the wonderful introduction and sharing a story that resonated with me. There were a lot of parallels in my life and probably resonated with some of you.

Over the past 10 years, the Center for American Progress has done incredible work to shape the debate over expanding opportunity for all Americans. And I could not be more grateful to CAP not only for giving me a lot of good policy ideas, but also giving […]