Tag Archives: wealth

Glass floors and slow growth: A recipe for deepening inequality and hampering social mobility


Editor’s Note:

This article originally appeared in The London School of Economics and Political Science blog British Politics and Policy on July 25, 2017.

Generations of British and American children have benefited from their parents’ hard work, which has contributed to many decades of strong economic growth. This has helped to ensure that, on average, children in their adult lives are economically better-off than their parents were at the same age. Authors But growth has now been weaker for many years. The absolute upward mobility taken for granted in the past, fueled by the creation of “more room at the […]

Damning evidence of wealth disparity highlights inequality across generations


The latest report of the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (Hilda) survey , released today by the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, shows that the real income of households is now lower than it was in 2009. And while the measure of income inequality appears stable, the report finds that housing ownership has drastically declined for people under the age of 40 as the economic disparity between those who own homes and those who don’t continues to widen.

Given the political focus from Bill Shorten on inequality, the release of the annual Hilda survey, which […]

To Defend Public Schools, the Hard Left Puts On the Tinfoil Hat


No, the school choice movement isn’t motivated by mysterious racists of the past.

This morning, a New York Times op-ed contributor went full Rousas Rushdoony. Never go full Rushdoony.

One of the more amusing aspects of life as a conservative Christian is reading liberals writing about conservative Christians — especially writing about conservative Christian political causes. There’s a formula. First, you’re told there are “dog whistle” or “hidden” reasons for the use of common terms. Second, these hidden reasons trace back to racists and Christian dominionists. Third, and finally, if you use this common language and advance mainstream conservative […]

We Only Resent Inequality When It’s Rigged


In addition to his exemplary work as a Senior Fellow for the Cato Institute, Johan Norberg narrates some great videos for Free to Choose Media. Here are some that caught my eye. The foolish and counterproductive War on Drugs .punish the rich

A grim consequence of Cuban communism.

The real lesson to learn from Sweden. But my favorite video, which I shared back in January, is his concise explanation of why policy makers should focus on fighting poverty rather than reducing inequality. I’m posting it again to set the stage for a discussion on inequality and fairness. Now let’s […]

A Tale of Two Americas: The High Costs of Being Poor in a Rich Land

people

Despite the long-held belief that high levels of inequality in the US signal future opportunity, a number of studies suggest that this is no longer the reality. This column examines trends in inequality from the perspective of well-being and focuses on non-economic aspects of welfare, including hope. The results reveal stark differences across people, races, and places in the US. Poor minorities – and blacks in particular – are much more hopeful than poor whites, while urban places are more hopeful than are rural ones, as are places with higher levels of diversity.

The US is as divided as […]

Meet Camille Busette, new director of the Race, Place, and Economic Mobility Initiative

Camille Busette, Senior Fellow, Director of Place, Race, and Economic Mobility

Camille Busette I’m Camille Busette , I’m a senior fellow in Governance Studies and I head up the new Race, Place, and Economic Mobility initiative here at Brookings.

Q: Where did you grow up?

A: I grew up in a variety of places actually, which I think has made me very much who I am. I was born in Los Angeles. I grew up in New York City, and then toward the end of high school my family moved to Sacramento, California where I finished up high school; and then I went on to University of California, Berkeley for […]

A tale of two Canadas: Where you grew up affects your income in adulthood


In Canada, geography is destiny: Your financial future, to a surprisingly large degree, depends on the place in Canada where you happen to grow up.

That reality is revealed on this map and our accompanying set of interactive graphics, produced using a new analysis of millions of Canadians’ income data , the result of years of work by economist Miles Corak.

His study charts intergenerational economic mobility – that is, the chance that people who spent their childhood in that location ended up, as adults, higher on the income and economic-status ranking than their parents. If a region is bright green, […]

Restoring America’s Economic Mobility

Frank Buckley
Author, The Way Back: Restoring the Promise of America Frank Buckley is a Foundation Professor at Scalia Law School at George Mason University, where he has taught since 1989. Previously he was a visiting Olin Fellow at the University of Chicago Law School, and he has also taught at McGill Law School, the Sorbonne, and Sciences Po in Paris. He received his B.A. from McGill University and his LL.M. from Harvard University. He is a senior editor of The American Spectator and the author of several books, including The Once and Future King: The Rise of […]

Climate change and inequality (Economist Economics)


Climate change and inequality

http://ift.tt/2udZCVJ Climate change and inequality ON JULY 12, the Larsen C ice shelf in Antarctica disgorged a chunk of ice the size of Delaware, a small state on America’s east coast. America’s government seems unfazed by the possibility that such shifts might one day threaten Delaware itself. Its climate defiance grows not only from the power of its fossil-fuel industry and the scepticism of the Republican party, but also from a sense of insulation from the costs of global warming. This confidence is misplaced. New research indicates not only that climate change will impose heavy […]

Documentary How Income Inequality and the Lack of Economic Mobility Threaten the American Dream (2013)

Economic mobility is the ability of an individual, family or some other group to improve (or lower) their economic status—usually measured in income. Economic mobility is often measured by movement between income quintiles. Economic mobility may be considered a type of social mobility, which is often measured in change in income.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economic_mobility

Socio-economic mobility in the United States refers to the movement of Americans from one social class or economic level to another, often by changing jobs or marrying. This “vertical” mobility can be the change in socioeconomic status between parents and children (“inter-generational”); or over the course of a lifetime […]